EVA Report – April 1st

Crew 208 EVA Report 01-APR-2019

EVA #1

Author: Julielynn Wong

Purpose of EVA: Flight testing of traditional versus new drone controller

Start time: 1100

End time: 1300

Narrative: Crew 208 set up pylons to conduct a flight test in a square pattern (60 feet in length) at an altitude of 20 feet to compare the performance of a standard versus new controller. Crew 208 ENG + HSO did figure-of-8 flight tests with a standard and new drone controller. Crew 208 XO did a hab roof inspection and ENG + HSO flew an exterior hab inspection with a traditional drone controller. Surveys were completed. Open-ended feedback was also recorded.

Destination: Hab

Coordinates (use UTM NAD27 CONUS): n/a

Participants: Dean Jin (XO), Amanda Manget (ENG), David Kim (HSO)

Road(s) and routes per MDRS Map: n/a

Mode of travel: Walking

EVA #2

Author: Julielynn Wong

Purpose of EVA: Flight testing of traditional versus new drone controller

Start time: 1430

End time: 1630

Narrative: Crew 208 COM and GHO conducted flight testing in a square pattern (60 feet in length) at an altitude of 20 feet and figure-of-8 pattern to compare the performance of a standard versus new controller. Flight test pylons were returned to Hab. Data collected will be forwarded to controller manufacturer.

Destination: Hab

Coordinates (use UTM NAD27 CONUS): n/a

Participants: Julielynn Wong (COM), Dean Jin (XO), Erika Rydberg (GHO)

Road(s) and routes per MDRS Map: n/a

Mode of travel: Walking

Journalist Report – April 1st

Crew 208 Journalist Report

Date: 01-April-2019

Author: Erika Rydberg

Drone Control to Major Tom: We’re Flying.

Today was our first full day on Mars, it was a beautiful day here at the Hab with the sun shining and some beautiful seasonal weather. We had two walking EAVs planned today to begin some drone testing with two groups. We realized in order to fly we needed some landmarks to help guide our flying, as we were testing out the use of two different controllers and needed to fly in patterns to properly test our drone controller usage. Amanda, an engineer by trade, made a crafty large cone out of neon paper and a 3D printer filament cardboard box that could be weighed down by rocks. Suited up and with four cones made, the first group led by Dean left the Hab, while those left behind worked on reports, research and made lunch of quinoa and chili. After lunch, we split up again with our second group going out to attempt drone flying.

We attempted flying figure-of-eights and square patterns with both drone controllers. For some (including this here crew journalist) it was the first time ever flying drones and hearing words like “yaw” which to some may sound more like a cowboy’s exclamation than a flight term. Yaw means to “oscillate about a vertical axis” and just like that we were practicing the moves that captains and pilots know by heart. Drone flying while in a spacesuit is one of the best things we’ve done yet – how many people are able to say they’ve done just that – worn a space suit and flown a drone? Flying the drone, one thing one might notice is that there are limited controls, no matter which controller you use. The controllers may seem simple at first glance, but the process of navigating the drone is a challenge, as you have to think about moving along three axes. Understanding the challenges of moving through space in the air or on the ground is a challenge on Earth, let alone on Mars. While some of us were focused on the sky, our other two crew members were working on the ground and getting some further exercise, using a bicycle to charge a battery.

Takeaways: whether you’re up in the sky or down on the ground cycling, Mars is the place to be!

Greenhab Report – April 1st

Crew 208 GreenHab Report – 01-April-2019

GreenHab Officer: Erika Rydberg

Environmental control:

Ambient with door open at 08:30

Shade cloth (80%) on

Average temperatures:

Average: 24.9 C

Low: 20.7 C
High: 33.4 C

Hours of supplemental light: 0

Daily water usage for crops: 5 gallons

Water in Blue Tank— 212 gallons

Time(s) of watering for crops: 8:30 and 17:00

Changes to crops: Planted leeks and spinach today.

Narrative: Plants are looking good, the temperature today was great for their growth.

Harvest: 4 grams basil; 1 gram oregano

Support/supplies needed: None

Sol Summary – April 1st

Crew 208 Sol Summary Report 01-APR-2019

Sol: 4

Summary Title: A Day of 3D Printing, Drones, and Biking (in sim)

Author’s name: Julielynn Wong

Mission Status: Nominal

Sol Activity Summary:

Crew 208 finished 3D printing our first drone map of MDRS! This map shows the MDRS structures in 3D, including the Hab, Greenhab, Science Dome, connecting tunnels, solar panel array, two observatories, repair access module, and rovers!

Useful things to 3D print at MDRS:
Tripod plate

We compared the performance of standard and new drone controllers in flight tests during our two EVAs today.

Crew HSO + ENG exercised for 1 hour on our bike study.

Crew 208 received their food rations this PM for our mission.

Our Astronomer is now cleared to use the MDRS Robotic Observatory

Look Ahead Plan: Continue bike study data collection in the Hab. Start data collection for thoracentesis study.

Anomalies in work: None

Weather: Sunny

Crew Physical Status: Nominal

EVA: #1: Hab; #2: Hab

Reports to be filed: Operations, Greenhab, Journalist, EVA Report, EVA Request, Mission Plan

Support Requested: Opportunity rover awaiting repair.

Green Hab Report – Mar 31st

Crew 208 GreenHab Report – 31-March-2019

GreenHab Officer: Erika Rydberg

Environmental control:

Ambient with door open

Shade cloth (80%) on

Average temperatures: 25.7 degrees Celsius

Low: 20.7

High: 33.4

Hours of supplemental light: 0

Daily water usage for crops: 7 gallons

Water in Blue Tank — 217 gallons

Time(s) of watering for crops:13:00 and 17:54

Changes to crops: None

Narrative: Water level was low today and we could not get any water from the upper faucet. We were able to draw water using the lower hose. XO refilled water in Greenhab this PM.

Harvest: 4 grams basil

Support/supplies needed: None

Operations Report – Mar 31st

Crew 208 Operations Report 31-MAR-2019

SOL: 3

Name of person filing report: Amanda Manget

Non-nominal systems: Generator

Notes on non-nominal systems: Radiator hoses and alternator need replacement on the generator. A contractor has been arranged to make these repairs within a few days.

Generator (hours run): 12.5

Solar – SOC 66% @ 1900 (before David turned on generator for the night)

Diesel Reading – 47%

Propane Reading – 54%

Ethanol Free Gasoline – 2 gallons

Water (auxiliary tank) – 0 gallons (Note: Not in Use)

Water (static tank) – 194 gallons

Auxiliary to Static tank transfer – No

Gallons transferred: 0

Water in GreenHab – 217 gallons

Static to Loft Pump used – Yes

Water Meter: 014225.5 gallons @ 1822

Toilet tank emptied: No

Deimos rover used: No, not functional

Hours: N/A

Beginning charge: N/A

Ending charge: N/A

Currently charging: N/A

Sojourner rover used: ASSIGNED TO DIRECTOR

Hours: N/A

Beginning charge: N/A

Ending charge: N/A

Currently charging: N/A

Spirit rover used: Yes

Hours: 85.3

Beginning charge: 100%

Ending charge: 68%

Currently charging: Yes

Opportunity rover used: Yes

Hours: 55.7

Beginning charge: 100%

Ending charge: 78%

Currently charging: No

Curiosity rover used: Yes

Hours: 85.9

Beginning charge: 100%

Ending charge: 69%

Currently charging: Yes

Notes on rovers:

Dean, David, Erika and I took the Opportunity and Curiosity rovers out to the Candor Chasma (out of sim). On Cactus Road 1104 (at 4252000 and 521000), a high temperature battery warning came on the Opportunity rover while driving straight, and it stopped suddenly. We tried to communicate with David but there was no signal. We waited approximately 20 minutes to wait for it to cool down, and we took Curiosity to a higher point to try to establish contact again, which we could not. Then we checked Opportunity and the warning was no longer there so we started on the path again. About 5 minutes later it stopped again. Then we took Curiosity to a high point again and were able to establish contact with Julielynn who was able to reach David. David then came on an ATV to tow Opportunity back. We arrived back at 1800.

ATV’s Used: (Honda, 300, 350.1, 350.2, 350.3) Honda

Reason for use: David towed Opportunity back to the Hab.

Oil Added? No

ATV Fuel Used: 0 Gals

# Hours the ATVs were Used today: 1

Notes on ATVs: None

HabCar used and why, where?

Atilla came from Grand Junction to MDRS.

Dean picked up water in Hanksville around 2000h to bring to the Green Hab.

CrewCar used and why, where? Not Used

General notes and comments: Nothing to report

Summary of internet: Nothing to report

Summary of suits and radios: EV suits normal, all batteries read > 12.5 volts

Summary of Hab operations: Checked SOC of electrical system as follows:

0730 SOC 100%, generator turned off by David

1300 SOC 100%, generator off

1900 SOC 66%, generator turned on by David

Summary of GreenHab operations: Nothing to report

Summary of ScienceDome operations: Nothing to report

Summary of RAMM operations: Nothing to report

Summary of any observatory issues: Observation submitted March 28th for MDRS-14 has not gone through yet.

Summary of health and safety issues: None

Sol Summary Report – Mar 31st

Crew 208 Sol Summary Report 31-MAR-2019

Sol: 3

Summary Title: Welcome to MDRS, NAU!

Author’s name: Julielynn Wong

Mission Status: Nominal

Sol Activity Summary:

Crew 208 continued to 3D print our drone map.

Crew 208 completed MDRS orientation, rover and spacesuit training today.

Our Crew 208 team photo was a group selfie taken via drone (i.e., a “dronie”).

GHO used Crew 208’s Insta-Pot to prepare a vegetarian lunch meal.

COM gave a tour of MDRS to NAU graduate students from 1400-1600.

XO + ENG + GHO + HSO drove rovers towards Candor Chasma for drone flights today.

XO + David traveled to Hanksville to refill the Greenhab water tank.

Look Ahead Plan: Continue 3D printing maps of MDRS in Hab. Start data collection for thoracentesis study. Begin sim this PM. David to deliver Crew’s 208 food supply on Sol 4.

Anomalies in work: Internet was offline all-day until 2040; Opportunity rover experienced battery overheating on Cactus Road 1104 requiring ATV towing by David.

Weather: Sunny

Crew Physical Status: Nominal

EVA: n/a

Reports to be filed: Operations, Greenhab, HSO Safety Checklist, Journalist, EVA Request

Support Requested: Please repair Opportunity rover

Journalist Report – Mar 31st

Journalist Report

Date: March 31, 2019

Author: Erika Rydberg

Crew 208 Reporting for Duty on Mars

Today we experienced our first full day as a crew, we were very excited to have five people on board for this journey and experience – Amanda, David, Julielynn, Dean and myself, Erika. We began the day with a shared breakfast of cereal, dried fruit, our preferred caffeinated beverages, and of course water, as one must never forget plenty of water in this dry environment. We surely expend more energy than we even realize on a daily basis with the work and exploring the vast landscapes around MDRS, and water is key to sustaining our activity and our well-being. Our community building has begun as we’ve started to share cooking duties and the adventures of cooking with the various unique supplies of our home. You can do a lot with a little kitchen expertise: we’ve had soup, pasta with pork and tomato sauce and beans and rice today, we’re lucky to have curious cooks in our crew. Over our delicious food today conversation was bountiful and we started the day with a fantastic conversation about space, becoming an astronaut, and the future ahead for some of the new companies creating opportunities to visit space.

One of our 3D printers continued progressing smoothly making a 3D map of MDRS first thing this morning. We’re happy to have some of our machinery working well in this complex dry environment.

For the three new members to the Hab at 10:00 sharp we reported to be trained on driving our rovers and the process of EVAs and we went on a small trip to experience more of the vast and curious landscapes we find ourselves in. The geology and landscape is incredible, one moment you’re looking at mounds of varying red, green and black land and then in the next moment, we’ve found a deep vast canyon. Upon returning from we took a quick crew “dronie” (a selfie with a drone), and then we were able to try on and use our space suits for the first time and attempt to see what it is like to maneuver first of all our bodies and then second of all our rovers while existing within a complex suit. On one hand, the suit feels cumbersome, but on another, the suit provides comfort through both safety and protection.

Julielynn greeted graduate students from Northern Arizona University and brought them through a tour of the Hab and MDRS. The rest of Crew 208 meanwhile, ran through some of our duties. We then adventured out again in our rovers for one last trip of fresh air and some more drone flying. One of our rovers got a bit stuck on the way back, but with the help of a tow, we were able to return safe and sound to our home, the Hab ready to see what lies ahead.

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