Sol Summary – Jun 8th

Astronomy Refit Crew – Sol 6, June 8th, 2019

Crew: Peter Detterline

Gary Becker

Peyton Zankel

Cole Armstrong

Ed Thomas

Narrative:

Last night was too cloudy to do any observing and this evening has brought wind.

Today, we had a rather busy day. This morning, we prepared the Musk Observatory for concrete by removing the caulking we just put in. That was a chore and a half to do since it wasn’t even fully set yet. During this, we also got to play host to a local singer Rod, whom we had the chance of meeting yesterday at dinner. We gave him a tour of the Hab and its surrounding buildings, as well as showing him the capabilities of the solar scope. Armstrong and I got an image of the sun processed during this time to show him how we process. This was great practice for us and helped Detterline with perfecting his new manual.

Armstrong, Detterline, and I went to Green River today to make sure we had the right concrete for the Musk. During this, Becker stayed behind to work on taking pictures for the VR project. Also, while we were gone, Scott and Eric arrived to pick up the spacesuits, and Thomas worked on the robotic observatory.

Detterline also finished up the video for solar imaging and we also started work on installing video cameras around the site.

Tonight will be a bit of a star party, so long as the weather holds. Scott, Eric, and Rod will be joining us tonight to observe the stars and potentially use the scope we have set up. While the sky is clear, the wind is starting to blow. Hopefully we do not have to cut our night short like last night.

Accomplished:

Solar Imaging and processing

Video made of solar imaging

Pulled grout out of the crack in the Musk Observatory

Ed worked in the Robotic Observatory with the 10 Micron mount. Replaced an antenna on the computer.

Worked on setting up the video camera system

Gary took pictures for the Mars VR project.

Power:

Soc = 96%

Problems:

Will be pouring concrete mix into the crack tomorrow.

Pictures:

Picture 1 was processed by Peyton Zankel and Cole Armstrong. Original pictures taken by Peter Detterline. Picture 2 was taken by Peyton Zankel of Peter Detterline viewing through the solar scope.