Science Report – February 11th

Crew 221 Science Report 11-FEB-20
Crew Science Officer: Hemani Kalucha

1. Microbiology Research
Today, we completed our sample catalogue: we identified the probable bacteria species for each sample that showed growth. One of the interesting samples was the bacteria growth from a sample taken from the Candor Chasma canyon floor. The bacteria is called Flavobacterium Capsolatum.

2. ISRU project
Today, corn sprouted from the half earth soil half grey martian soil today!

3. Mung Beans

Nothing Further to report.

4. Radio Communication

Today, we disassembled the radio and Crew Engineer Louis and Crew Astronomer Ghanim reassembled the radio on an EVA, proving that it is compatibly as a mobile communication device!

Science Report – February 10th

Crew 221 Science Report 10-FEB-20
Crew Science Officer: Hemani Kalucha

1. Microbiology Research
Today, we prepared new agar samples, to fill the empty petri dishes. And all new samples collected from 2 evas today were prepared as well.

2. ISRU project
Today, corn sprouted from the control tub, which contains Earth soil. But still, we felt encouraged!

3. Mung Beans

Today, we used some sprouted mung beans in our dinner tonight!

4. Radio Communication

Nothing further to report.

Science Report – February 9th

Crew 221 Science Report 09-FEB-20
Crew Science Officer: Hemani Kalucha

1. Microbiology Research
Today, we put more samples in the incubator to test for bacteria growth. This time, we used our own agar in the samples.

2. ISRU project
Nothing further to report.

3. Mung Beans

Nothing further to report.

4. Radio Communication

Crew Engineer got the antenna to successfully capture and decipher digital signals from around the world (Canada, France, Bangalore!) Photo report shows the transcript of signals captured.

Science Report – November 25th

Crew 221 Science Report 08-FEB-20
Crew Science Officer: Hemani Kalucha

1. Microbiology Research
Today, we tried to investigate the samples with bacteria growth under a microscope. One of the results was very exciting and is attached in the photo report.

2. ISRU project
Today, we tested the nutrient levels of the soil being used to grow black corn. We used a soil test kit, which involved putting in soil and water and a specific nutrient capsule (Phosphorous, Potassium, Nitrogen). The solution then changed to a specific shade after 10 minutes, and we could identify the state of soil healthy by looking at the coloured scale provided for each nutrient.

3. Mung Beans

We planted Mungbeans in 3 variations of soil, 100% martian soil, 50% martian soil and 50% earth soil, 70% earth soil and 30% martian soil. The soil used was from the EVA conducted at Condor Chasma yesterday. After planting, we inserted a conductivity probe and measured the salinity and water content of the soil with Arduino sensors. We need to convert the relative values to actual units.

4. Radio Communication

Crew Engineer constructed an antenna and got the radio to receive signals in the hab today! The antenna is 20 metres long, and it is in the RAM right now. It was listening at 40 m and 80 m wavelengths today, and managed to capture some interesting conversation all the way from Phoenix, Arizona: 465 miles away!

Science Report – February 7th

Crew 221 Science Report 07-FEB-20
Crew Science Officer: Hemani Kalucha

1. Microbiology Research
Today, we continued our microbiology experiment. We observed further growth in bacteria in the dirty space suit sample. The bacteria was primitively identified as Bacillus subtilis. We also successfully made some Agar today. We added sugar, water, gelatin, and beef boullion to make the Agar. We then added the Agar to 12 petri dishes. All samples were weighed and put into the catalogue. Lastly, we did some preliminary pH soil testing on the samples.

2. ISRU project
The martian soil was cracked and inhospitable to plants, so we adjusted the ISRU experiment to be half martian soil and half earth soil, with all the same other parameters. Hopefully, the results will be kinder.

Science Report – February 06th

Science Report

Crew: 221

Date: 06-FEB-20

Crew Science Officer: Hemani Kalucha

1. Microbiology Research Today, we experimented with the microbiology samples collected from yesterday’s EVA. Each sample was weighed and one gram of each sample was taken for futher preparation. The 1 gram was put into 100ml of distilled water and then diluted further into 9ml of distilled water with 1 ml of of the previous solution (10^-3 concentration of potential bacteria). A small amount of the final solution was then spread onto the petri dishes to be incubated at 25degC. The samples from yesterday were inspected and the first signs of bacteria growth was identified on the sample of the space suit before we cleaned the helmet. This sample will be further analysed in the coming days. A first attempt to prepare our own agar was done but resulted in a spill which was cleaned and a new attempt will be done tomorrow.

2. ISRU project Today we set up four trays – one control fertilized soil with perlite and three different types of mars regolith, collected on EVA 4. Within each sample, half was fertilized and half was not. Then, several rows of black corn were inserted and kept in direct sunlight in the greenhab. Each tray was watered with 0.5 litres. The soil health and crop health will be monitored over the next week.

Science Report – January 28th

  

Morgan Kainu
Crew Journalist/Scientist/Geologist
MDRS Station, Crew 220

Crew 220 MDRS Science Report 28JAN2020
Sol 9
Author: Morgan Kainu, Crew Journalist/Scientist/Geologist
Today the MDRS and MAU crew conducted its first Geological Extra Vehicular Activity (GEVA) at “Kissing Camel Ridge” and “North Ridge”. Prior to the EVA, Science Officer Morgan Kainu provided an orientation to geological science, soil sampling and stratification analysis. In addition, several EVA objectives were set including to:
1. Conduct a safe EVA;
2. Formulate and test a hypothesis relating to geologic soil sampling;
3. Become familiar with procedures of geological soil sampling;
4. Become familiar with procedures of stratification analysis (that helps to know how old the area is (dating));
5. Be able to identify the chemical compensation of the soil (led by Aquila); and
6. Practice using the microscope (led by Raven and Owl).

The purpose of this Extra Vehicular Activity (EVA) was to become familiar with procedures of geological soil sampling, become familiar with procedures of stratification analysis (for understanding how to date the area), be able to identify the chemical compensation of the soil samples and practice using the Foldscope portable microscopes for sample observations.
The crew also formulated a hypothesis prior to leaving on the EVA. They discussed the most probable planet geological history, discussing whether or not it was formerly an ocean or not. The Null Hypothesis (Ho) was that “The planet’s geological history was shaped by oceanic influences, generating marine fossils and organic material”.
Only one of the objectives were not met (chemical composition) as we were short of time.

Upon concluding the soil sample and stratification analysis we had sufficient information to reject the Null and accepted the Alternative hypothesis (H1); that the planet’s geological history was not oceanic – rather, but it was formed at least in part by alluvial sediment deposits.

Science Report – January 27th

  

Crew 220 MAU Science Report 27Jan2020

Sol 8

Author: Shawna Pandya, Commander

We have been testing a portable vital sign sensor for obtaining biometrics throughout this mission and I am delighted to share that after several days of troubleshooting, the sensors are back online and gathering valuable data! These sensors have previously been tested underwater, in Antarctica and by NASA back on Earth, but this is the first time they have been tested on Mars!

In addition, we are conducting an EVA biometric wellness study, wherein we assess crew biometrics just before and after EVAs. We have gathered lots of good data so far and will continue to do so.

Tomorrow we will spend the day on geological science, briefing on soil sampling methods, then going out to collect soil samples on EVA, and finally analyzing our samples post EVA.

We are very lucky in that we share our studies with MDRS crew and we anticipate a lot of good data coming out of this mission.

Science Report – January 06th

  

Crew 219 Research Report 06-JAN-20
Crew Science Officer: Hannah Blackburn

1. Biometrics and Neurobehavioral Research

Sleep logs began today. Post-EVA biometrics were recorded.

2. UAV

Nothing to report.

3. Dust Mitigation for Optical Mirrors

A site was selected for the mirror to be placed (between the Musk Solar Observatory and the Robotic Observatory). The optics mount was assembled.

4. Astrophotography of Celestial Bodies

Submitted an observation of the Crab Nebula with MDRS 14. Hopefully we will have clear skies soon.

5. Remediation of Mars Regolith

Samples were collected on EVA 1 and 2.

6. Chemical and Mineralogical Composition of the MDRS Site

Crew members practiced using the geological sampling tool while taking samples for #5. Locations were selected for tomorrow’s EVAs (North Ridge and Kissing Camel).

7. Protocols for the Discovery of Life on Mars

Nothing to report.

Glassware check out:

For the duration of the mission, we will need 10 glass beakers (sizes between 200 and 500 ml) to dry regolith samples in the oven, and one glass pipette to measure BG11 media for the regolith remediation project.

Science Report – January 13th

  

Crew 219 Science Report 13-JAN-20
Crew Science Officer: Hannah Blackburn

1. Biometrics and Neurobehavioral Research

We continued taking sleep logs and post-EVA biometrics and surveys.

2. UAV

Nothing to report.

3. Dust Mitigation for Optical Mirrors

Cleaned the optical mount using air pump.

4. Astrophotography of Celestial Bodies

False color image of the Crab Nebula will be attached with the next
Astronomy Report.

5. Remediation of Mars Regolith

Samples observed under microscope.

6. Chemical and Mineralogical Composition of the MDRS Site

Samples were dried in the oven using glass beakers. Additional samples
collected during EVA 13.

7. Protocols for the Discovery of Life on Mars

Nothing to report.

Glassware check out:

10 glass beakers (sizes between 200 and 500 ml) were used to dry
regolith samples.

A reminder to all crewmembers: There's a $300 fine for using any
glassware material without MDRS Mission support permission.