Science Report – March 7th

Research report 6 March 2020
Crew 223
Submitted by Crew Scientist Marion Lebrun

1. LOAC and Weather Station:
Nothing to report. Everything is working as it should. We hope the
instruments resist the heavy wind of today.

2. MegaARES:
Nothing to report. Everything is working as it should. We are waiting a
bit longer to collect another round of data.

3. Solar oven:
The oven was taken outside for the first time this morning during the
EVA. It managed to heat 600mL of water from 10°C to 67°C in a bit less
than two hours. Florian is very satisfied with this first round of data.
He now plans to repeat the experiment with the same amount of water but
with a different orientation towards the Sun to compare the yield of the
solar oven.

4. BackPack and LCVG:
Nothing to report.

5. Foreign languages (Human Factors):
Communication within the teams is well established and much more
efficient than on the first session. There are almost no mistakes on the
parts chosen to build the given models which shows how communication has
improved. I have noticed a lot less silents during the 10min of LEGO
building. Crew members ask for a lot more precision and details:
sometimes it might slow down the construction but it certainly avoids
misinterpretations. I am overall very satisfied with the way the
experiment is going.

6. Group collaboration (Human Factors):
Nothing to report.

7. Crew members’ individual planning display:
A first draft has been successfully tested although emails and Internet
data are still missing (but the current sol schedule with the sport
schedule is there). Blandine and I have decided to give up on the email
window being refreshed every hour; we are thus going to create a
hyperlink to the Mission Support email page that would be a shorter path
than having a crew member open his/her computer to check it. The same
thing will be done for the available Internet data.

8. Relaxation and positive psychology (Human Factor):
Nothing to report. Everything works well.

9. Music for plants (GreenHab):
Yesterday was the first session of the experiment: the radish plants
are stimulated by UV light and music (sequence of notes that favors the
synthesis of a protein making the plant UV resistant) for 7 minutes
every day.

10. Spirulina growth (GreenHab):
Nothing to report. Everything is working as it should, nothing new. It
is too early analyse the impact of the type of fertilizer on the
spirulina growth.

11. Aerospring (GreenHab):
We have increased the watering (20 to 25 minutes twice a day instead of
15 minutes twice a day) due to the very dry atmosphere. Hopefully it
will increase the lettuce growth.

12. Water consumption monitoring:
Nothing to report.

13. Soundless EVA:
We want to test a protocol for a soundless EVA. Our aim is to avoid any
verbal communication between the Habcom and the EVA team, and also
within the EVA team. Of course each of us will have a working radio in
case of a problem or emergency. Here is the detailed protocol :
– we stop communications as soon as we enter in the airlock.
– we use a white board and a marker to write down all the requested
numbers : rovers’ hours, levels of charge, static tank level and time.
If needed, this board might also be used to communicate between us.
– when the airlock light is switched off by the Habcom, it means that
the depressurization is finished and that we are allowed to go outside.
– once outside, each of us will have a specific role. Three will do the
usual checks while one (the communicator) will hold the board and meet
the others to allow them to write down their data. Then the communicator
will communicate those data (using signs and gestures we have chosen) to
the Habcom, who will be looking at him through the upper-deck window.
– then the EVA team will wait for a signal from the Habcom (still
through the window) giving them the authorization to leave the Hab zone.
– in each buddy team, one will guide the pilot for the U turn.
– before the EVA, we will decide which rover will be first to leave.
– during the rover ride, the first rover needs to know if the 2nd rover
is following. Thus we have imagine a specific protocol. Every 1 min
(signal will be given by the copilot who will have a watch), the first
rover will stop on the right side of the road. The 2nd rover will slowly
pass the first one by the left. Then the stopped rover will move and
follow the new first one. And so one. Of course we will drive slowly,
especially during passing.
– when we arrive at our target destination, the first rover stops in the
middle of the road for about 20sec (to allow the 2nd one to stop
behind). Then the 1st rover will move and park on the left side of the
road (not right side to avoid any misunderstanding with the stop on the
right, that is dedicated to let the 2nd rover pass). The communicator
will come to the 2 pilots with the board to let them right down the
level of charge of the rovers.
– when we leave our target destination, after the U turn, the 1st rover
stops on the right of the road and the 2nd rover passes the 1st one by
the left.
– during the exploration, we will use most of the gestures we already
use to communicate during our EVAs. We will of course stick together,
the first walker will often turn around to check that everybody is still
there and fine. Every 10min, the leader will ask, using a gesture, how
the team feels (regarding their suits and their fatigue). Each member
(including the leader) must answer on a scale from 1 to 5. If 1,
everything is fine; if 4, we go back home; if 5, we use the radio and go
back home. Of course, once again, each team member is free to use its
radio if he/she feels he/she needs to.
– when we arrive in the Hab zone, the challenge is to get the approval
from the Habcom that allows us to park near the Hab. The EVA team will
stop near the Science Dome to wait for the approval. During the last
30min of the EVA, the Habcom will check every 5min or so if heshe sees
the EVA team waiting for the approval. He/She will allow us to park with
a sign through the window.
– the communicator will once again communicate rover’s data to the
Habcom. Once received the Habcom will allow with a gesture the EVA team
to enter in the airlock.
– the last gesture will be from the EVA team, to inform the Habcom
through the small window of the airlock that the airlock is closed. Then
the Habcom will start the pressurisation by switching on the airlock’s
light.
In our opinions, this protocol has a real interest in case of the loss
of the 4 radios of the EVA team.
Here is Luc’s feedback after having applied this protocol :
He made an extensive briefing before entering in the airlock to make
sure everybody (including the Habcom of course) had the protocol in mind.
The five minutes of depressurization were the opportunity for each of us
to think about their upcoming actions and tasks. We walked out of the
airlock, Aurélien installed the solar oven, while Clément and Marion
checked the 3 rovers, and Luc checked the level of water in the static
tank. Then Marion, as communicator, was in charge to communicate through
the window all our data to Valentin, the Habcom. She did it
successfully, as Valentin understood all the figures.
The rover ride was the opportunity to test the passing procedure. For
the EVA Leader Luc, it was the most challenging part of the protocol as
the pilot of the first rover has no visibility. But everything went
smooth and we can assert that this passing procedure is very efficient
and safe for both rovers.
The exploration was the chance to test our communication protocol,
especially the 1 to 5 scale, used to know how each EVA team member
feels. It was efficient, but we found that it can be improved. Because
two members answered 3 out of 5 for the fatigue but during the
debriefing, we noticed that they had a really different interpretation
of that number (one was about to ask to go back home, while the other
one was almost ok). So we need to clarify what each number corresponds
to, to make sure we all have the same reference scale.
For our return, the Habcom was waiting for us, looking through the
window with binoculars. He gave us the approval to park the rovers near
the RAM. Marion once again was in charge of communicating the rovers’
data to the Habcom. Then we entered in the airlock at 11:15 AM for the 5
last minutes of silence of the day !
It was an interesting experience for all of us, and it was the
opportunity to demonstrate that this type of protocol is efficient and
usable in case of loss of all our radios during an EVA !

14. Supernova research:
It is a project common with the Crew 222. Based on a file gathering
galaxies potentially having supernova, the two astronomers have selected
around 50 galaxies and the have been doing observations every week. For
now, they have not found anything but Florian keeps looking.

Astronomy Report – March 7th

Crew 223 Astronomy Report Mar 07 2020

Name: Florian Delpech
Crew: 223
Date: 3/7/2020

MDRS ROBOTIC OBSERVATORY
Robotic Telescope Requested (choose one) MDRS-14

Objects to be Imaged this Evening: 6 galaxies for the research project
(2 that were not taken well and 4 that were forgotten yesterday): NGC
4621 ; NGC 5047 ; NGC 2655 ; NGC 3031 ; NGC 3344 ; NGC 4450

Images submitted with this report: A picture of M106 for the
astrophotography project.

Problems Encountered: For NGC 4621 two WCS files were missing and for
NGC 5047 just one.

MUSK OBSERVATORY

Solar Features Observed: N/A

Images submitted with this report: N/A

Problems Encountered: N/A

EVA Report – March 7th

Crew 223 EVA Report 07-03-2020
EVA # 6
Author: Luc Fortin (Engineer)
Purpose of EVA: Change the batteries for MegaARES and LOAC. Install the
solar oven. Test a protocol for a soundless EVA.
Start time: 09:09 AM
End time: 11:20 AM
Narrative: This EVA was very special for us as it was a soundless one.
So I made an extensive briefing before entering in the airlock to make
sure everybody (including the Habcom of course) had the protocol
(detailed in the EVA request) in mind.
The five minutes (09:09 – 09:14 AM) of depressurization were the
opportunity for each of us to think about their upcoming actions and
tasks. We walked out of the airlock, Aurélien installed the solar oven,
while Clément and Marion checked the 3 rovers, and I checked the level
of water in the static tank. Then Marion, as communicator, was in charge
to communicate through the window all our data to Valentin, the Habcom.
She did it successfully.
Then we drove to the LOAC and MegaARES with one passing between rovers 1
and 2 that went smooth. In 5min, we change the batteries of the 2
instruments, still without a word ! We leaved the place at 09:33 AM and
arrived at Reservoir Dam 11min later. The protocol for the rover ride
was very efficient and safe for both teams.
We walked to the Reservoir which was almost empty. Then we decided to
walk East in the canyon. Landscapes were really amazing. Was also the
opportunity for us to test our communication protocol, especially the 1
to 5 scale, used to know how each EVA team member feels. It was
efficient, but we found that it can be improved. Because two members
answered 3 out of 5 for the fatigue but during the debriefing, we
noticed that they had a really different interpretation of that number
(one was about to ask to go back home, while the other one was almost
ok). So we need to clarify what does each number correspond to, to make
sure we all have the same reference scale.
We leaved Reservoir Dam at 10:57 AM, and arrived at 11:10 AM in the Hab
zone. As planned, the Habcom was waiting for us, looking through the
window with binoculars. He gave us the approval to park the rovers near
the RAM. Marion once again was in charge of communicating the rovers’
data to the Habcom. We brought back the solar oven and entered in the
airlock at 11:15 AM for the 5 last minutes of silence of the day !
It was an interesting experience for all of us, and it was the
opportunity to demonstrate that this type of protocol is efficient and
usable in case of loss of all our radios during an EVA !
Destination: Reservoir Dam.
Coordinates (use UTM NAD27 CONUS): 12S 518500 4250800 and 12S 518350 4252800
EVA Participants: Luc Fortin (EVA Leader, Engineer), Aurélien Mure
(Commander), Marion Lebrun (Crew Scientist), Clément Plagne (Journalist)
Road(s) and routes per MDRS Map: Cow Dung Road
Mode of travel: Driving (and walking when off-road)
Vehicles used (If applicable): Rovers Perseverance and Spirit

GreenHab Report – March 7th

Crew 223 GreenHab Report – 07-03-2020 GreenHab Officer: Valentin
BELLEMIN-LAPONNAZ

Environmental control: Ambient with Door open

Average temperature: 24.5°C
Low temperature: 21°C
High temperature: 26°C

Hours of supplemental light: 4 hours (from 9P.M to 1 a.m.)

Daily water usage for crops: 10.5 gallons

Daily water usage for research and/or other purposes: 0 gallon

Water in Blue Tank— 143.1 gallons

Time(s) of watering for crops: 3 (1 only for tomatoes and radish)

Changes to crops: Two pots of lettuce were harvested totally, I am going
to replant some tomorrow.

Narrative: This morning, I watered the GreenHab quickly before doing the
HabCom for the EVA. For lunch, I harvested zucchini flowers to make a
deep fried recipe. After lunch, I carried out the Day 2 of the
experiment Music For Plants. For the moment results are not visible.
Before dinner, I harvested Wild Rocket, Lettuce, Basil and Sage.

Harvest: 3g Zucchini Flowers / 10g Basil / 5g Sage / 100 g Lettuce /
100g Wild Rocket / 20g White onions

Support/supplies needed: NA

Operations Report – March 7th

Crew 223 Operations Report 07/03/2020

SOL: 6

Name of person filing report: Luc FORTIN

Non-nominal systems: Nothing to report

Notes on non-nominal systems: Nothing to report

Friday generator:
Off at 6:00am
On at 8:53pm SOC was 88%

Saturday generator:
Off at 6:00am
On at 9:00pm SOC was XX%

Diesel Reading – 70%

Station Propane Reading – 75%

Ethanol Free Gasoline – 5.5 gallons (1.5 taken today to fill up the ATVs)

Water (loft tank): 47 gallons

Water Meter: 149736.10 units

Water (static tank) – 292 gallons

Static to Loft Pump used – yes

Water in GreenHab – 143.1 gallons

Water in ScienceDome: 0 gallons

Toilet tank emptied: no

Perseverance rover used: yes
Hours: 150.1
Beginning charge: 100%
Ending charge: 97%
Currently charging: yes

Sojourner rover used: ASSIGNED TO DIRECTOR
Hours: Nothing to report
Beginning charge: Nothing to report
Ending charge: Nothing to report
Currently charging: Nothing to report

Spirit rover: yes
Hours: 134.1
Beginning charge: 100%
Ending charge: 63%
Currently charging: yes

Opportunity rover used: moved from campus to the shop to repair the brakes.
Hours: Nothing to report
Beginning charge: Nothing to report
Ending charge: Nothing to report
Currently charging: Nothing to report

Curiosity rover used: no
Hours: 139.5
Beginning charge: 100%
Ending charge: 100%
Currently charging: yes

Notes on rovers: Nothing to report

ATV’s Used: yes (Honda, 1, 2 and 3)
Reason for use: I started the 4 ATVs during the engineer EVA for battery
check.
Oil Added? no
ATV Fuel Used: Nothing to report
Hours the ATVs were Used today: Nothing to report.
Notes on ATVs: Thanks to Shannon, all the ATVs are full of gas.

HabCar used and why, where? The HabCar is parked at the MDRS Campus.

CrewCar used and why, where? The CrewCar is in Grand Junction.

General notes and comments: Nothing to report

Summary of internet: All ok.

Summary of suits and radios: Suits 4, 7, 8, 9 were used during the EVA.

Summary of Hab operations: Nothing to report.

Summary of GreenHab operations: Nothing to report.

Summary of ScienceDome operations: Nothing to report.

Summary of RAM operations: Nothing to report.

Summary of any observatory issues: Nothing to report

Summary of health and safety issues: Nothing to report

Questions, concerns and requests to Mission Support: Nothing to report

Journalist Report – March 7th

Crew 223 Journalist Report 05Mar2020
Author: Clément Plagne, Crew Journalist
Sol 6
Title: The Sound of Silence
A couple days ago on EVA, Marion unfortunately lost the use of her comms
headset, making her incapable of communicating with the rest of the
expedition by radio. Fortunately, thanks to the little nonverbal
communication we’d all learned to be more efficient, she was able to
pass over her EVA leader role and carry on the EVA normally. This
situation made Aurélien wonder: what if all our comms failed? EVAs limit
our senses drastically already, as the bulky suits limit our vision and
our movement. Even with the radios, it can prove difficult to coordinate
rovers on the road. As he came back in the Hab, he asked the question:
could we carry on an entire EVA without once using our radios?

Communication is the absolute centre of any EVA. We need to be clear
with the HabCom inside, who needs data on vehicles and water outside,
needs to give us permission to get in and out of various zones, and
requires updates to be given as we stop near the Hab to change batteries
on experiments set up within communication range. Between crewmembers on
EVA, communication is kept to a minimum, as radio chatter quickly
becomes impossible to understand if people try to talk over one another.
What remained, however, was of course the important communications:
whether everyone was feeling alright, what direction we need to be
going, or when the rovers need to stop or turn. A lot of crucial
communication goes through those radios, and imagining the ways to
eliminate the need for them and find alternatives is a tough task. While
we were outside yesterday morning with Blandine, Valentin and Florian,
Aurélien, Luc and Marion were thinking of a protocol to carry on a fully
silent EVA.

The final proposal, as given to us by Luc, was clever and felt fool
proof. Our five required minutes of airlock depressurisation would be
directed by the lights turning on or off by the HabCom on the other
side. The beginning measurements of data from the water tank and rovers
around the Hab were distributed among us, and would be relayed by Marion
using hand gestures to Valentin, our HabCom, looking through a window in
the Hab. He would respond similarly and give us the go or no go to take
the rovers outside. To ensure that no rover was left behind on the way,
the one in front would periodically stop and wait to be passed by the
other, and the dance would go on until reaching our destination. By
foot, most things can be done by mime – hand gestures were decided to
tell each other about our levels of fatigue and pain, making sure that
we can go back if someone is too uncomfortable.
The test was a complete success, and the EVA went on nominally without
one word spoken. Two years ago, the Supaéro MDRS crew drew up similar
plans on how to carry on an EVA in case of injury of a crewmember. These
are all possible events during an EVA, and we were glad to continue
doing research on similar themes. The communication between crews on a
year to year basis is one of the strengths of our missions, and this
gives us great hopes for even better experiments in the years to come.

The Science Dome was a lot less quiet though. Marion’s experiment on
foreign language communication is still running strong, and the English,
German and Spanish speaking are still working to build LEGO figures and
find new ways to be understood by the other. The puzzles are getting
rather hard, but what’s interesting is that the speaking pairs are
starting to develop their own slang to describe different pieces, and
much less time is wasted compared to the first attempts. Next week, a
different game: Keep Talking and Nobody Explodes. An asymmetric,
fast-paced bomb defusal game where one person sees puzzles, but only the
others have the manual to solve them. We’re all getting right in sync,
so this can only be exciting!

Sol Summary – March 7th

Crew 223 Sol Summary Report 07-03-2020

Sol: 6 Summary Title: Quiet biodiversity

Author’s name: Aurélien Mure – Crew Commander

Mission Status: Mid rotation

Sol Activity Summary:

The crew woke up at 6:50am. The sport session began at 7:00am. Knowing
that tomorrow will be our rest day regarding sport helped the crew to be
motivated by the session. Having a day without an exploration EVA and a
physical activity tomorrow is a good choice for the crew mental and
physical status. I don’t think it is mandatory for the scientific
purposes of our mission but it is the better way to have an efficient
and satisfying second week.
The daily EVA has been a new experience for me. Dealing with the
efficiency of communication has been interesting. We have proved that a
routine EVA can be performed with its complexity without saying a single
word. The protocol is complex to but not that hard to set up. I want to
thank Luc for having followed me on that idea. We explored the eastern
region of Reservoir Dam. The biodiversity there was completely different
from what we have been used to.
The oven has been set up outside and even without a perfect sun we
heated 600mL of water from 10°C to 67°C in 2 hours. We will give more
details in the future science reports. I have finally had time to start
working on our automatic water consumption device.

Look Ahead Plan: Taking some rest tomorrow.

Anomalies in work: None.

Weather: Mostly cloudy, rare sun lights, 0°C at 7:00am, 18°C at 3:00pm

Crew Physical Status: All crew members safe and sound.

EVA: LOAC and MegaAres batteries changed. Quiet exploration

Reports to be filed: Journalist report, Operations report, EVA request,
Green Hab report, EVA report, Astronomy report, Science report, HSO report

Support Requested: None