EVA Report – January 31st

Crew 220 EVA Report 31JAN2020

EVA 12

Author: Johannes Svensoy, MD

Purpose of EVA: Joint Station-to-Station Medical EVA training

Start time: 09:00

End time: 12:00

Narrative: This is the second medical EVA where we integrated search and rescue (S&R) in austere environments, P-MARCH-P protocol, METHANE protocol, second survey assessment, and SAMPLE. This scenario integrated several simulated injured astronauts.

The EVA started with the MDRS crew members coming over to the MAU Station with the medical mannequin, EVA bag, First Aid kit, and Golden Bubble pressurized medevac device. The medical mannequin was placed at the first medical site just South of MAU Station at GPS 12s518124, 4250680. The EVA lead from MDRS was then informed about the simulated missing astronaut and possible injury. The team started S&R and localized the astronaut. EVA lead took the command post role, while the two medical personnel, one from each station, assessed the injured astronaut. A simulated major Incident was declared with METHANE to both MDRS and MAU Station, then the Injured astronaut was transported in the Golden Bubble pressurized medevac device to the nearest station, MAU Station. Per the simulation, the EVA team was informed that the facilities were not suitable for assessing the patient, the decompression sequence was aborted, and the patient was evacuated quickly to MDRS via rover.

Arriving at MDRS there was a simulated rover accident with another victim. The first patient was decompressed in the airlock together with two other astronauts. The lower deck of MDRS was turned into a surgical bay for surgical interventions with the leg injury. The crew members inside then performed a secondary survey and SAMPLE history. The second simulated victim was assessed by the two medical officers, and then transported to the airlock for decompression.

The EVA ended at this point when all the astronauts and simulated injured astronauts were inside the Hab. The post-exercise debrief highlighted communication challenges, which are anticipated in larger incidents. Learning points also included how to divide the team during decompression of patients, and following the current state of the patient before and after decompression.

The crew performed admirably and demonstrated practical skills application of S&R skills, P-MARCH-P, METHANE, evacuation techniques, and secondary survey including a SAMPLE history. Except some initial communication challenges, everything went as planned. The crew returned in good health.

Destination: MDRS and MAU Station proximity

Coordinates: 4250050,518500

Participants: HabComm: Morgan. EVA Crew: John, Connie, Marufa, and Johannes.

Road(s) and routes per MDRS Map: Cow Dung Road 0110 between the MDRS and MAU Station.

Mode of travel: Mainly walking, but rovers used for transporting equipment and extraction of simulated injured astronaut.

Support Requested: No support requested during EVA.

Sol Summary – January 31st

Crew 220 (MDRS) Sol Summary 31Jan2020

Sol: 12

Summary Title: End (almost) of the Mars Journey: Station-to-Station Medical EVA

Author’s name: Marufa A. Bhuiyan, International Astronomy Researcher and Connie Delisle, PhD

Mission Status: Nominal

Sol Activity Summary: The MDRS-MAU crews woke up at 07:00 on this beautiful red planet – Mars. Captivated by its timelessness, we confirmed this was indeed a real “time” through using our precious radios located at both stations. About time and space – we understand that time passes at different rate for different people and we need space for ourselves. No wonder we needed a reality check – it was a breathtaking view outside on Mars. Let us not forget to have a quick glance (about sky, land and weather) as we did here on Mars, watching through Mars unfolding though the unique round-shaped kitchen windows in the Hab. No humans (or animals) were running around outside; I could not spot anyone! The crew had some brief but intensive conversations in the short span of our quick regular breakfast together. Today’s topics included: culture, science, world politics, religion, human behavior to name a few. Since we had a pre-scheduled join MAU-MDRS Medical EVA (MEVA) at 09:00 we finished our breakfast really quick and postponed our precious conversations for the next round.

Building on lessons from yesterday’s MEVA, MDRS crew members felt mentally organized and capable of implementing what they learned in Mars which to humans is an austere environment. MDRS MEVA crews drove the rovers (e.g. Curiosity and Spirit) from MDRS Habitat to Mars Academy USA (MAU) Station which took only a few minutes. We were confident about starting our journey to MAU station because we had a professional doctor (Dr. Johannes Svensoy, MD), an efficient videographer who is also the Commander for MDRS (John Hanacek) and two talented crew members (Connie Delisle, PhD and Marufa Bhuiyan, MSc.) from different parts of the planet Earth. As soon as we reached MAU station, we were cordially greeted and well received by two sophisticated MAU crews (Matt Wise and Lee Roberts, MSc.) from the MAU station. Commander Hanacek did a great job in setting up the plot for injury site (simulated injured astronaut) in a proper location (GPS Coordinate: 12518124, 4250680) while we were waiting for other two crew members (Wise and Roberts) to return from MDRS to fetch radios we determined we needed. The combined team (both MDRS and MAU crews) proceeded to execute a Search and Rescue (SAR) and quickly located the injury site. They two attending medical professionals (Wise and Svensoy) executed the initial medical assessment (P-MARCH-P) protocol. Since all injuries on Mars are deemed as major, we called for METHANE and injured astronaut (simulated/dummy) was transported in the “Golden Bubble” – a pressurized medivac device prototype invented by Crew member Wise. As soon as both rovers arrived at the MDRS station, we had another simulated incident near at the corner of the GreenHab – simulating the rover running over crew astronaut Marufa Bhuiyan’s (who tries to be a human) right foot. Immediately two Crew astronauts helped the injured astronaut, the medical professionals also took great care to assess the condition.

The MEVA ended successfully today; by that I mean we will learn from our errors and take to heart the things we did efficiently. An exciting achievement was in getting the drone in the air and taking Arial shots of the MEVA.

Just after the lunch, the GreenHab Officer went to our amazing green-looking spaceship we call “GreenHab” to put some labels, setting up recycle bins, and cleaning/sweeping the Hab for the next crews. We request MDRS to replace these labels with permanent labels or, re-label these newly planted seeds (e.g. Ginger brought by our crew member Matt Wise, Romania Lettuce, Radish Sparkle, Bell Pepper (California Wonder) and re-arranged a mystery seed; no one knows what plant it is, probably a surprise for the next MDRS crews. In addition, we added a new red handled paint brush (to clean dust), seed bank (not labelled yet), hand sanitizer, napkins, and labelled two recycle bins/tubs (organic and inorganic/non burn) for the future crews.

Look Ahead Plan: Sol 13. Today marks the close of the MEVAs. Commander Hanacek issued orders to focus on report writing, preparing the end of mission report for the MDRS leadership, completing inventories and cleaning.

Anomalies in work: None

Weather: Tonight, -6 degrees Celsius and a high of 4 degrees Celsius tomorrow. No perception predicted.

Crew Physical Status: All the Crew is good health, despite a very short night.

EVA: None planned.

Reports to be filed:

Journalist Report

Sol Summary

Photo Report
Operations Report
GreenHab Report

Support Requested: Final garbage pick-up on Feb 2 (our departure date). There is only two rolls of toilet paper left – the incoming crew will require some additional toilet paper no doubt.

Journalist Report – January 31st

Crew 220 (MDRS) Journalist Report 31Jan2020

Author: Connie Delisle, Crew Journalist

Title: The Art and Science of Life on Mars

We arose today knowing it was the last opportunity to experience an MEVA and to complete science and research projects here on Mars. Despite heightened awareness of the need to focus on the Mission while keeping in mind the impeding work to return to Earth, attention waned in preparation of the MEVA and made the start more challenging than expected.

Today’s lessons reinforced that life’s snags can also be the best of teachers. As MEVA team leader I faced unfamiliar decisions, taking longer than anticipated to figure out how to deal with a communications issue. As this was rectified, the crew was able to recover its stride going into the Search and Rescue/Medical Evacuation exercise confidently. I felt that the team shifted into a smoother operational rhythm for the remainder of the MEVA. Successfully finding, treating and evacuating the fallen astronaut seemed to build confidence and familiarity – perhaps we were being guided by the XO Svensøy’s words of last evening – to challenge ourselves and not to try to be perfect – embrace failing. We added more complexity into the exercise scenario by aborting the compression cycle to bring a patient to MAU Station, rerouting to MDRS and in doing so, having a crew member play the role of an injured SAR personnel. Although focused and appreciating the seriousness of treating injuries on Mars, many crew members reported feeling excited and stimulated in being able to creatively adapt as they had learned in their professions on Earth.

Following lunch MAU and MDRS enjoyed lunch together as well as shared personal reflections. It was heart-warming to hear the level of appreciation from each and to know that free will exists to make connections with crew mates going forward.

So the saying goes – All good things come to end [Ref: Geoffrey Chaucer, 1300s]. This came to mind last night and it seemed destined for use in closing this last journalist report. Chaucer’s words serve as much as reminder that the time at MDRS is ending. However, it has also created a beginning – to embrace and accept that everything going forward is temporary. That as Commander Hanacek offered at lunch, the power is within each us to design our own destiny. In my words, it means to sort through one’s own “garbadges”, truly claim what is real, true and authentic; retire and return negative programming to sources where it may have come; to speak for oneself and let others own their own ‘stuff’.

With that, leaving Mars then isn’t an end. It marks a continuation to explore on Earth, the circularity and impermanence of life itself.

Until we rendezvous again,

Connie Delisle, PhD, MDRS Journalist Crew 220

EVA Report – January 31st

Crew 220 EVA Report 31JAN2020

EVA 12

Author: Johannes Svensoy, MD

Purpose of EVA: Joint Station-to-Station Medical EVA training

Start time: 09:00

End time: 12:00

Narrative: This is the second medical EVA where we integrated search and rescue (S&R) in austere environments, P-MARCH-P protocol, METHANE protocol, second survey assessment, and SAMPLE. This scenario integrated several simulated injured astronauts.

The EVA started with the MDRS crew members coming over to the MAU Station with the medical mannequin, EVA bag, First Aid kit, and Golden Bubble pressurized medevac device. The medical mannequin was placed at the first medical site just South of MAU Station at GPS 12s518124, 4250680. The EVA lead from MDRS was then informed about the simulated missing astronaut and possible injury. The team started S&R and localized the astronaut. EVA lead took the command post role, while the two medical personnel, one from each station, assessed the injured astronaut. A major Incident was declared with METHANE to both MDRS and MAU Station, then the Injured astronaut was transported in the Golden Bubble pressurized medevac device to the nearest station, MAU Station. Per the simulation, the EVA team was informed that the facilities were not suitable for assessing the patient, the decompression sequence was aborted, and the patient was evacuated quickly to MDRS via rover.

Arriving at MDRS there was a simulated rover accident with another victim. The first patient was decompressed in the airlock together with two other astronauts. The lower deck of MDRS was turned into a surgical bay for surgical interventions with the leg injury. The crew members inside then performed a secondary survey and SAMPLE history. The second simulated victim was assessed by the two medical officers, and then transported to the airlock for decompression.

The EVA ended at this point when all the astronauts and simulated injured astronauts were inside the Hab. The post-exercise debrief highlighted communication challenges, which are anticipated in larger incidents. Learning points also included how to divide the team during decompression of patients, and following the current state of the patient before and after decompression.

The crew performed admirably and demonstrated practical skills application of S&R skills, P-MARCH-P, METHANE, evacuation techniques, and secondary survey including a SAMPLE history. Except some initial communication challenges, everything went as planned. The crew returned in good health.

Destination: MDRS and MAU Station proximity

Coordinates: 4250050,518500

Participants: HabComm: Morgan. EVA Crew: John, Connie, Marufa, and Johannes.

Road(s) and routes per MDRS Map: Cow Dung Road 0110 between the MDRS and MAU Station.

Mode of travel: Mainly walking, but rovers used for transporting equipment and extraction of simulated injured astronaut.

Support Requested: No support requested during EVA.

Operations Report – January 31st

Crew 220 Operations Report 31JAN2020

Sol: 12

Name of person filing report: Matt Wise

Non-nominal systems: Primary Generator, Water Heater, Hab lower deck 1 fluorescent light ballast.

Generator: Primary is inoperable. Rental was run-the following information is for the rental.

Hours run: 11.5
From what time last night: 20:00

To what time this morning: 07:30

List of any additional daytime hours when the generator was run: N/A

Solar- SOC% (Before the generator is run at night): 79%

Diesel Reading – Just over 1/4 mark

Station Propane Reading- 76%

Ethanol Free Gasoline- N/A

Water (loft tank) (gal) – 35

Water Meter (units)- 0148627,9

Water (static tank) (gal) – 43

Static to loft Pump used – Yes 38 gal

Water in GreenHab (gal): 100.04

Water in Science Dome (gal): 0

Toilet Tank Emptied – Yes

Deimos rover used: Still in the workshop

Hours:

Beginning Charge:

End Charge:

Currently Charging:

Sojourner rover used: No

Hours:

Beginning Charge:

End Charge:

Currently Charging:

Spirit Rover used – Yes

Starting Hours: 128.6

Beginning Charge: 100%

Ending Hours: 128.7

Ending Charge: 91%

Opportunity Rover used: Still in workshop

Hours:

Beginning Charge:

Ending Charge:

Currently Charging:

Curiosity Rover used: Yes

Starting Hours: 134.6

Beginning Charge: 100%

Ending Hours: 134.7

Ending Charge: 91%

Notes on rovers: Opportunity and Deimos off-site for maintenance. Should be operational within a few sols

ATVs Used: (Honda, 300, 350.1, 350.2, 350.3): No

Reason for use:

Oil Added? Checked and added as necessary

# hours the ATV’s were used today: 0

Notes on ATVs:

Habcar used and why, where? Yes. For water resupply

CrewCar used and why, where? Yes. In SLC picking up supplies

General Notes and Comments: A small white bowl was accidentally broken while washing the evening dishes.

Summary of the internet: Nominal

Summary of Suit and Radios: 3 radios malfunctioning
Suits Nominal

Summary of Hab: Main fluorescent lights in Hab lower deck malfunctioning. The problem seems to stem from irregular electrical current flow from temp generator. Center light bar has been fixed and seems to function properly at all times, light bar near back airlock has been repaired and seems to be functioning properly, while light bar near stairs has no bulbs.

Summary of Science Dome operations: Nominal

Summary of Ram operations: Crew member using RAM for assembly of 3D printer

Summary of any observatory issues: Nominal

Summary of Health and Safety issues: MDRS crew all healthy

Questions, concerns, and requests to Mission Support: Please remove trash from rear airlock. Final trash pickup Feb 2. Resupply of toilet paper.

EVA Report – January 31st

Crew 220 (MAU) EVA Report 31JAN2020

EVA 12

Author: Johannes Svensoy, MD

Purpose of EVA: Joint Station-to-Station Medical EVA training

Start time: 09:00

End time: 12:00

Narrative: This is the second medical EVA where we integrated search and rescue (S&R) in austere environments, P-MARCH-P protocol, METHANE protocol, second survey assessment, and SAMPLE. This scenario integrated several simulated injured astronauts.

The EVA started with the MDRS crew members coming over to the MAU Station with the medical mannequin, EVA bag, First Aid kit, and Golden Bubble pressurized medevac device. The medical mannequin was placed at the first medical site just South of MAU Station at GPS 12s518124, 4250680. The EVA lead from MDRS was then informed about the simulated missing astronaut and possible injury. The team started S&R and localized the astronaut. EVA lead took the command post role, while the two medical personnel, one from each station, assessed the injured astronaut. A major Incident was declared with METHANE to both MDRS and MAU Station, then the Injured astronaut was transported in the Golden Bubble pressurized medevac device to the nearest station, MAU Station. Per the simulation, the EVA team was informed that the facilities were not suitable for assessing the patient, the decompression sequence was aborted, and the patient was evacuated quickly to MDRS via rover.

Arriving at MDRS there was a simulated rover accident with another victim. The first patient was decompressed in the airlock together with two other astronauts. The lower deck of MDRS was turned into a surgical bay for surgical interventions with the leg injury. The crew members inside then performed a secondary survey and SAMPLE history. The second simulated victim was assessed by the two medical officers, and then transported to the airlock for decompression.

The EVA ended at this point when all the astronauts and simulated injured astronauts were inside the Hab. The post-exercise debrief highlighted communication challenges, which are anticipated in larger incidents. Learning points also included how to divide the team during decompression of patients, and following the current state of the patient before and after decompression.

The crew performed admirably and demonstrated practical skills application of S&R skills, P-MARCH-P, METHANE, evacuation techniques, and secondary survey including a SAMPLE history. Except some initial communication challenges, everything went as planned. The crew returned in good health.

Destination: MDRS and MAU Station proximity

Coordinates: 4250050,518500

Participants: HabComm: Shawna. EVA Crew: Matt, and Lee.

Road(s) and routes per MDRS Map: Cow Dung Road 0110 between the MDRS and MAU Station.

Mode of travel: Mainly walking, but rovers used for transporting equipment and extraction of simulated injured astronaut.

Support Requested: No support requested during EVA.

Commander Report – January 31st

Crew 220 (MAU) Commander’s Report 31Jan2020

Author: Shawna Pandya, Commander

Title: Twelve we meet again…

Sol 12. Last day. Wow. Time flies here on Mars. The morning at MAU started with a breakfast with our visiting Ambassador, MDRS Engineer Wise, and myself and MAU Engineer Roberts had fruitful discussions on mission and station operations and logistics.

Before long, it was time for our joint search-and-rescue and medical simulation with MDRS Station. I genuinely enjoyed this experience as this was one of the rare EVAs in which I served has HabComm, which afforded me a birds-eye view of the crew’s movements in the simulation. Let me say, they made my job easy today, due to their admirable and competent performance in a complex scenario.

The afternoon was spent on end-of-mission and check-out duties, such as science and project summaries, cleaning and reports, with a view to squaring ourselves away in time for one last evening together tonight.

There is still so much to say, but sometimes brevity says it all. I have thoroughly enjoyed co-commanding this mission with MDRS Commander Hanacek, and learned something from every single member of this crew.

When you hear from me next, it will be from Earth. This is the end of one mission yes, but with the bonds formed here, I suspect we have also sown the seeds for many more adventures. I wonder what the future holds…

Until my next communication (from Earth!),

Commander Pandya
Callsign: Nightowl
MAU Station, Crew 220

Sol Summary – January 31st

Crew 220 (MAU) Sol 12 Summary 31Jan2020

Summary Title: Sol long, Marswell
Author’s name: Shawna Pandya, Commander
Mission Status: Winding down… (already?!)
Sol Activity Summary: Today is our last Sol at MAU station, and we made the most of it! The Sol started with MAU Station hosting MDRS Engineer Wise as its Ambassador, yielding a fruitful and productive exchange regarding mission and engineering operations and logistics. Next, both MAU and MDRS stations conducted a a joint medical EVA exercise which tested the EVA team’s search-and-rescue, medical assessment and evacuation capabilities. The team shone and performed admirably amidst a complex situation! The afternoon was rounded out with check out cleaning, inventorying, report-writing and wrap-up activities, leaving the evening free for the crew to enjoy each other’s company one last time amidst art and Indian food. Sol long, Mars! You’ve been good to us.
Look Ahead Plan: Tomorrow, we return to Earth!
Anomalies in work: None
Weather: -6C low / 5C max, 0C average.
Crew Physical Status: MAUtacular
EVA: Successful search-and-rescue, medical triage and evacuation mission accomplished today in a joint exercise with MAU.
Reports to be filed:
Sol Summary
Commander’s Report
Photo Report
Operations Report
EVA Report
EVA Request: None
Support Requested: Commander requesting a half-sweet almond milk mocha with an extra shot of espresso pretty please

GreenHab Report – January 31st

GreenHab Officers: Marufa Bhuiyan and Morgan Kainu

Environmental control: Heating. GreenHab door shade cloth (40%) (30%) on.

Average temperatures: 19.3 °C
08:33
Floor Unit: 20 °C
12:30
Floor Unit: 26 °C
13:49
Floor Unit: 15 °C
18:15
Floor Unit: 16 °C

GreenHab door opened: 12:30 and closed: 13:49

Hours of supplemental light: 19:30 to 00:00

Daily water usage for crops: 13.7 gallons

Daily water usage for research and/or other purposes: NA

Water in Blue Tank 100.04 gallons

Time(s) of watering for crops: 2
08:33 = 6.3 gallons
18:15 = 7.4 gallons

Changes to crops: The following tubs/plants need to be relabeled:
• Ginger (fresh from market – it was brought in to mission by crew member Matt Wise).
• Mystery seed ( Crew member M. Bhuiyan re-arranged found a mystery seed, there was no label in it and no one knows yet what plant this is. Probably it will be a surprise for the next MDRS crews).
• Romania lettuce, Radish sparkle, Bell pepper (California Wonder)

Harvest: 22 g icicle radish, 14 g purple sun radish, 7 g cilantro, 4 g basil, 4 g oregano, 3 g lemon balm, 4 g marjoram, 14 g wild rocket, 3 g buttercrunch, 1 g chives, 7 g lettuce

Support/supplies needed: NA

Other notes:
• Sweeped the floor, getting ready to introduce our GreenHab to the next MDRS crews.
• Labelled two tubs as recycle bins: 1. Organic (plant remains/dead plants) and 2. Inorganic (non-burn items).
• Added a new cleaning brush (red color)